Summer Fridays 2.2

SF2

The second mix of the 2009 summer season. This one was an attempt at mostly gritty, psychedelic sounds, but I made room for the Jean-Paul Sartre Experience who I've been revisiting lately (I guess they're psychedelic), as well as some other things that don't quite fit in the garage. Cover art this week is by Jinners who you may know from Spicy Times or Door Girl Art. There's a hi-res version included if you want to burn a CD and print it out the cover. If you'd like to contribute art to an upcoming mix, do get in touch.

DOWNLOAD SUMMER FRIDAYS 2.2

As always, the songs segue together so no shuffling please. Here's the tracklist:


1.    The Fall – Cruiser's Creek
2.    The dB's – Cycles per Second
3.    Pas Chic Chic – Haydée Morcelée
4.    Tomorrow – My White Bicycle
5.    Amazing Baby – Kankra
6.    Jean-Paul Sartre Experience – The Loving Grapevine
7.    Thee Oh Sees – Tidal Wave
8.    The Kinks – Funny Face
9.    The Inbreds – You Will Know
10.    Hospitality – Betty Wang
11.    The Go-Betweens – People Say
12.    The Who – Armenia City in the Sky
13.    The Intelligence – Moody Tower
14.    Hell on Wheels – As We Play
15.    Oranger – Stony Curtis in Reverse
16.    Lyres – Help You Ann
17.    The Three O'Clock – Jetfighter
18.    The Weather Prophets – Almost Prayed
19.    The Beets – What Did I Do?
|20.    The Turtles – Outside Chance
21.    The Pastels – Something's Going On
22.    Redd Kross – Play My Song
23.    Sloan – G to D  

Liner notes after the jump…


1.    The Fall – Cruiser's Creek
One of the biggest, baddest riffs in The Fall's catalogue (courtesy Mark E. Smith's then-wife, Brix). The lyrics are pretty good too, some nice imagery… shirtails flapping in the wind. This was a non-album single, though it was appended to This Nation's Saving Grace. One of the greatest bands ever.

2.    The dB's – Cycles per Second
I used to dislike Chris Stamey's songs on dB's records: the weird, close harmonies, skwonky keyboards. But I've since come to prefer them to Peter Holsapple's pure pop. This is one of his best from their near-perfect 1981 debut, Stands for Decibels.
 
3.    Pas Chic Chic – Haydée Morcelée
The requisite French language song on this mix. These guys are from Montreal and features a former Godspeed You Black Emperor. No idea what this song is about, if anything, but it sure sounds cool.
  

4.    Tomorrow – My White Bicycle
Classic psychedelic single from 1967 and the production still sounds amazing today. I love the backwards bike chains, all the cool little touches and phase effects. The lyric, in case you were wondering, is based on the communal white bicycles that were available for anyone to use in Amsterdam.
 

5.    Amazing Baby – Kankra
I'm not sure why people hate on Amazing Baby. Sure, they dress kind of silly but there's no denying the musicianship, the inventiveness of the arrangements and generally awesomeness of their songs. Well there's no denying it to me, at least. From their debut, Rewild, which is out next week.

6.    Jean-Paul Sartre Experience – The Loving Grapevine
Before they became obsessed with becoming New Zealand's answer to Spacemen 3, The Jean-Paul Sartre Experience made some really lovely, mildly psychedelic music on thier debut, Love Songs, which is where you can get this song. If it was in print.
 

7.    Thee Oh Sees – Tidal Wave
New single from John Dwyer and company on Woodsist. Even within such a narrow genre as garage, Thee Oh Sees have manage to create an instantly recognizable sound. Maybe they've patented their reverb and echo settings. Their new album, Help, is worth seeking out too.
 
8.    The Kinks – Funny Face
I know people go on and on about Village Green Preservation Society and Arthur, and I like those records plenty, but I'll take Face to Face and Something Else over them any day. This is a Dave Davies track, sporting a killer riff.  
 

9.    The Inbreds – You Will Know
These duo — bass and drums — were part of the Halifax, NS explosion of the early '90s that happened when Sloan became super hot. This was their first album I think, Kombinator, and the only one that got released in the US. Bass and drums is a gimmick but they made it work. Great songs help.

10.    Hospitality – Betty Wang
Misheard Lyric Case File 246: I thought the lyric, for whatever reason, was "Sous chef! Sous Chef! Sous Chef!" but was informed by Hospitality singer Amber Papini that she's actually singing "Su Chia," which is Betty's Chinese name. I love Amber's voice, and her songs fit it so perfectly with it. I am smitten.
 

11.    The Go-Betweens – People Say
This is from "the lost album" the band recorded in '78 – '79 that didn't see the light of day until the late '90s. It's one of my favorites, maybe because it's free of all the clarinets, strings and '80s production which weighed down some of thier '80s albums (Talulah comes to mind, great songs it may have). This is one of Robert Forster's songs, and I won't lie: seeing the Tartans cover this live was the inspiration for its inclusion here.

12.    The Who – Armenia City in the Sky
Opening track to The Who Sell Out, probably my favorite of their albums, showing that Pete Townsend can be as psychedelic and ambitions as Syd Barrett, John Lennon, whoever. The production is kind of weird though, the trippy effects are louder than any of the instruments.
 

13.    The Intelligence – Moody Tower
My friend Toby has been pushing the Intelligence on me for some time and it took me getting their new album, Fake Surfers, on vinyl to finally push me over the edge and declare love for this band. More garage, yes, but this is a weird postmodern take on it. 
  

14.    Hell on Wheels – As We Play
This is probably the only thing on this mix that sounds like it was made now. From Sweden, another find courtesy of Jim at Parasol Records who seeks out the coolest Scandinavian sounds. 
  

15.    Oranger – Stony Curtis in Reverse
Before Thee Oh Sees, Fresh and Onlys and Ty Segall was Oranger, lovers of all things '60s. This was from their 2000 masterpiece, The Quiet Vibrationland. The song title, a Flintstones reference, of course. Perfection in just over a minute.
  

16.    Lyres – Help You Ann
This nugget from 1984 sounds like the blueprint for every Hives song ever written. From Boston, originally signed to Ace of Hearts, the same label as Mission of Burma. Sounded retro compared to all the drum machines of the era, but it now just sounds timeless.
 
17.    The Three O'Clock – Jetfighter
Armed with a voice most people thought belonged to a girl, Michael Querico's The Three O'Clock were one of the main bands in LA's '80s Paisley Underground, so it was called. (See also: The Dream Syndicate and the Bangles.) The band would later suffer from '80s-itis, but this is one of their finest moments.
  

18.    The Weather Prophets – Almost Prayed
Pete Astor fronted The Loft and the the Weather Prophets, mining all aspects of Lou Reed's repertoire. This is perhaps their best song.
  

19.    The Beets – What Did I Do?
From Jackson Heights, Queens, a neighborhood better known for it's Indian and Thai food than any bands. But The Beets are changing that perception. I can't quite figure out why they're so good… but they are.

20.    The Turtles – Outside Chance
Misunderstood as fluff, the Turtles were one of the '60s greatest musical pranksters, almost like a Steely Dan before
people really understood irony. But they wrote killer songs in addition to being clever, and you should really seek them out beyond "Happy Together."
 

21.    The Pastels – Something's Going On
One of the Pastels earliest singles for Creation, showing off their immediate way with melody… and lack of musical skill. All for the best.

22.    Redd Kross – Play My Song
The McDonald brothers are supreme rockologists, distilling decades of riffs into killer homages. This was always one of my favorites from their indespensible album, Neurotica.

23.    Sloan – G Turns to D 
What happens when a guy teaches his girlfriend to play guitar? Tragedy. This song tells the tale. "She's aware it's all been done before / It's another song in this key / yeah but this songs about me."
  

3 Comments

  1. Great mix, Bill, but I have to take issue with your take on The Go-Betweens. I prefer the '86-'88 period, though I also agree that Tallulah is kind of weak. Liberty Belle and 16 Lovers Lane are all-time favorites here, though. "People Say" is a great one, in any case. Have you ever heard Jay Reatard's take on "Don't Let Him Come Back"? I have to confess that his cover made me appreciate the original, much like what you wrote about The Tartans covering "People Say".

  2. I figured I'd hear from you on this subject, Matt. I like 16 Lovers Lane a lot, but I listen to Before Hollywood and Spring Hill Fair more now as the '80s production grates on me now, as great as the songs may be. Also I prefer Robert's songs to Grant's, if I had to choose, and I know you're the other way. Robert's songs definitely work betyter with stripped-down production.
    And I think their best album, hands down, is Friends of Rachel Worth.
    And it didn't take the Tartans covering the song to make me appreciate it, it just reminded me of that record.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *